Slide the Chancellor's red box to select how much extra money to give the health and social care system in England.

£m extra per week




Over one year, that’s .


Where would you like to invest that money?





In one year, spending an extra across both health and social care would pay for the following additional staff and activity:

This selection is based on current patterns of spending and is for illustrative purposes only. All calculations are based on current prices.

Please use the slider above to select an amount of additional money to give the health and social care system. A breakdown of what that money will buy will appear here when you do.


GPs

There are currently 42,000.

RCGP estimate that England will need 8,000 new GPs by 2020.


GP consultations

439,983,000 occur every year.

That's a increase. If demand for general practice continues to rise at the rate estimated by the King’s Fund, it would increase 19.3% by 2020/21.


One year of residential social care for older people

An average 228,200 receive residential social care each year.


nurses

There are currently 315,500.

Current estimates are that 21,000 nursing places are vacant and demand is expected to continue to grow.


urgent procedures

6,997,000 occur every year.

That’s a rise of . NHS England estimate that demand for hospital care will rise 31% by 2020/21.


planned operations

6,941,000 occur every year.

That’s a rise of . NHS England estimate that demand for hospital care will rise 31% by 2020/21.


pharmacists

There are currently 29,400.


prescriptions

1,083,663,000 are issued every year.


health visitors

There are currently 14,210.


consultants

There are currently 46,500.

That's a increase. Activity in hospitals is expected to rise by 15.9% by 2020.


care

There are 465,000 care home beds. Our reference home has 60.

Industry analysis suggests 33,500 more beds will be needed over the next five years. That is the equivalent of 560 more care homes.


small rural

There are 101,600 hospital beds in England. Our reference hospital has 170.

Our work on hospital beds showed that the NHS would need an additional 10,000 beds by 2020/21. That is the equivalent of 60 small hospitals.


One year of care for people with psychosis

An average 184,000 people receive care for psychosis each year.

That’s a rise of . We have assumed that all spending goes towards the main mental health interventions for adults classified by NHS trusts. This overstates the overall increase, as in reality it is also likely to be spread across other services like care for children and addiction services. NHS England estimate that demand for mental health care will rise 27% by 2020/21.


One year of care for people with non-psychotic mental conditions

An average 502,000 people receive care for non-psychotic mental conditions each year.

That's a rise of . We have assumed that all spending goes towards the main mental health interventions for adults classified by NHS trusts. This overstates the overall increase, as in reality it is also likely to be spread across other services like care for children and addiction services. NHS England estimate that demand for mental health care will rise 27% by 2020/21.


ambulance callouts

7,378,000 occur every year.

Over the last five years, the number of ambulance callouts rose by 538,000.


carers

There are currently 645,000.

The International Longevity Centre estimates that England faces a gap of 200,000 social care workers by 2020.




About this interactive slider

This slider relates specifically to the NHS and to council-funded social care for older people in England.

We distribute funding across eight different areas, based on their share of past spending. Seven of these areas are within the NHS and reflect major spending lines on frontline services as categorised by the Department of Health. For the categories that reflect spending on NHS trusts and private providers, we have split out mental health and ambulance services to reflect how distinct they are from the hospital and nursing services which make up most of this spending. Social care for the over-65s is counted separately. Funding figures are taken from the total expenditure and gross revenue spending breakdowns in the Department of Health annual accounts for 2014-15, and our estimates with the King’s Fund of net social care spending in the same year. We assume that the extra spending does not go on administration or “other” services, and the share that would have been taken up by these is redistributed.

For illustrative purposes, each of these is represented by typical staff members and procedures. These eight areas are:

Costs and salaries based on a range of sources, including NHS Digital workforce statistics, PSSRU unit cost analysis, and NHS Reference Costs, are then used to estimate how many more staff, buildings and procedures the money would buy in each area. For areas represented by more than one thing, the money is shared out so that the percentage increase in each item is the same. This is to reflect the reasonable expectation that the number of staff is likely to increase in line with the number of services they provide. For staff groups, we count non-staff overheads and costs like pensions and national insurance to give an accurate picture of the full cost to the NHS.